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Editing and Other Intimacies

I believe I’ve waxed poetic about how much I love the editing process. In fact, I have several blog posts that prove this statement.

As a young writer, I hated editing. I believed staunchly in the fact that what I had written was the best form the story would ever take and that I had intended every scene the way they had been written. You could not get me to edit beyond grammatical errors.

I think this hatred stemmed from that fact that I took the process of editing personally. Having someone tell me what to change in my story was tantamount to telling me what to change in myself. This was my baby. And like any parent, I saw my baby as perfect. This is probably where my writing courage comes from.

Of course, I soon realized that hating editing was hubris at its height. What I have written is not perfect, nor will it ever be. As soon as I understood this, a whole new world opened up for me. One that is built on trust.

An editor has great power over a writer and the process of creation. Receiving editorial notes can be like being handed the Holy Grail. A list of ways to improve your story. Who wouldn’t want that?

Can you imagine if the list given to you was all wrong? Or if the editor had been careless about the advice given? Or if the editor was so green he or she didn’t know they were inflicting damage instead of helping improve the story?

Over the years, I have heard and read many editing horror stories. And it pains me to admit, but I’ve suffered through a couple them that to this day leaves me doubting my abilities to write.

This is because editing is such an intimate process. It is the breaking down of a story and building it up again. It is the development of a character. It is approaching scenes from a different angle.

I count myself fortunate to be working with an awesome, often awe-inspiring, editing team. Which is why any shortcomings you might find in No Love Allowed and any of my other novels moving forward are entirely my own. I have never loved editing this much in my writing career. It’s a process I enjoy immensely because it’s amazing to see how different the first draft is from the finished product.

I waxed poetic again, didn’t I?

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